Sputnik Radio: Many Ways to Bypass Facial Recognition Technology’ in iPhoneX

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Facial Recognition – Russian Radio Sputnik interviews LGMS founder

 Facial Recognition

Apple this week unveiled the iPhone X, a US$999 gadget that will allow users to unlock it using facial recognition technology. An expert told Sputnik how vulnerable the technology is to hacking. Commenting on the launch of the new iPhone X, an expert in information security warned of hacking dangers, telling Sputnik “nothing is foolproof” when it comes to technology.

Choong-Fook Fong, Chief executive officer of LGMS, a professional information security service firm, said there had always been concerns about the use of facial recognition technology in consumer products. One of the concerns is “transferring how we look into unique data” when using facial recognition.

“How are we going to protect that unique data? It can be obtained by the criminals and people can impersonate you by obtaining that data,” explained Mr. Fong, who specializes in computer crime investigation, penetration testing and information security compliance.

“Nothing is foolproof. There are so many ways to bypass or hack facial recognition. People will be using photographs of the real person or do make up.”

“One of the biggest concerns is whether facial recognition data is going to be shared with the phone manufacturer or stored locally on the phone? If it is stored locally on the phone what kind of protection is the manufacturer putting in place to protect that data? But if that data is sent back to the manufacturer we have much greater concerns. There are way too many possibilities the manufacturer can use that data for,” Mr. Fong told Radio Sputnik.

(excerpt from SputnikNews)

Full article from SputnikNews

 

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